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Reviews shows sugary drink taxes reduce consumption

Reviews shows sugary drink taxes reduce consumption
June 25, 2019

A 10% tax on sugary drinks has cut the purchase and consumption of sugary drinks by an average of 10% in places it has been introduced, according to a just published review.

Researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, combined evidence from settings where a sugary drinks’ tax had been applied and evaluated it into a meta-analysis. Studies included four cities in the USA (Cleveland, Ohio; Portland, Maine; Berkeley, California; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), a regional tax in the Spanish region of Catalonia and the effects of country-wide taxes were studied in Chile, France and Mexico.

The research is published in the international scientific journal, Obesity Reviews.

Lead author Dr Andrea Teng says the research takes a new approach in combining multiple studies examining the real-world impact of sugary drink taxes on sales, purchases and dietary intake before and after taxes were imposed, or between taxed and untaxed settings.

Dr Teng explained “this new review presents compelling evidence that sugary drink taxes result in decreased sales, purchasing or dietary intake of taxed beverages. For a 10% tax, sugary drink volumes declined by an average of 10%.

“It shows taxes on sugary drinks are an effective tool to reduce consumption, and we know from other research that the high consumption of sugary drinks increases the risk of obesity, diabetes and dental caries.”

Dr Teng adds that there is also evidence that sugary drink consumption may contribute to heart disease, cancer and premature death.

Some of the studies looked at the alternative drinks people consumed instead of sugary drinks after the tax was applied. With a 10% tax on sugary drinks, there was a 1.9% increase on average in such alternative drinks, and for water specifically there was a 2.9% increase. This healthier substitution pattern is not conclusive, but in three out of the four settings where substitution occurred, the increase in consumption of the other non-sugary drinks was statistically significant.

A co-author of the review, Dr Amanda Jones, says all the individual studies in the review found a reduction in sugary drink consumption, but the impact in some settings was greater than others. Applying tax by thresholds of sugar content, rather than as a percentage of price, appeared to be important for determining a more favourable impact.

Other reasons for differences between settings may be the combination with other obesity prevention policies, the public’s awareness of the tax, industry responses, consumer preferences, border permeability, availability of alternative beverages, and sensitivity to price. For example, Chile also decreased tax on low-sugar beverages at the same time as increasing the tax on high-sugar beverages; Mexico introduced a sugary drinks tax combined with a junk food tax; and France also taxed soft drinks with artificial sweeteners.

Dr Jones explained “some of the differences found in these studies may also be due to non-price mechanisms. For example, a tax may signal to the public the seriousness of the health concern associated with consuming a product.

“A tax can also prompt manufacturers to reformulate sugar levels downward, as seen in the UK, even before their tax was introduced in April 2018.”

Some studies looked at the impact of sugary drink taxes by socio-economic factors, but more research is needed in this area, the authors say. In Mexico, for instance, there were greater consumption declines in lower income households, while the opposite was true in Chile.

The World Health Organization recommends governments impose a 20% tax on sugary drinks, saying the evidence for reduced consumption and meaningful health effects is strongest for this food category.

While successive New Zealand Governments appear to have had little interest in introducing sugary drink taxes, Dr Teng concludes “it is probably inevitable that this type of tax, which is highly targeted at protecting child health, will need to be seriously considered by New Zealand politicians.”

In the meantime, she suggests that Governments consider other options, including:

• Prohibiting all sugary drink sales at all schools and sports facilities used by children. This is already happening at some schools.
• Banning all sugary drink advertising that is targeted at children.
• Introducing mandatory health star ratings on sugary drinks and other food and beverages.
• Introducing a cap on serving sizes for sugary drinks as has been done in France (see recent New Zealand modelling at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30660706

The research paper, Impact of sugar-sweetened beverage taxes on purchases and dietary intake: systematic review and meta-analysis, is published in Obesity Reviews.

Click here to view the full article.

Images show Dr Teng (middle) and Dr Jones (below).

Related Articles

25th March 2018 - Otago researchers reveal childhood predictors of becoming overweight or obese

12th April 2017 - Junk food constitutes majority of purchases from swimming pool kiosks

26th March 2017 - NZREPs asks if a Sugar Tax is the Best Solution to Obesity?

13th February 2017 - Arabian Gulf nations to tax sugary drinks

23rd November 2016 - Grattan Institute report says sugar tax could halt growing obesity rates

17th October 2016 - New Zealand’s ‘no sugary drinks’ logo launch sends clear health message

29th July 2016 - Sugary drinks dropped from Auckland Council leisure centres

14th April 2016 - YMCA Australia backs calls for taxes on sugary drinks

3rd April 2016 - New Zealand wellness experts call for sugar tax

14th January 2016 - The devastating impact of soft drinks on public health

18th July 2015 - Sellers of sports drinks may soon be able to add ‘misleading’ health claims

5th February 2014 - World Health Organisation calls for Governmental restrictions on alcohol and sugar

22nd April 2012 - Sport scientist critical of sports drinks for fluid over consumption during exercise

8th April 2012 - Sports science conference speaker slams sports drinks


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